Bitcoin mining mit dem Raspberry Pi - Teil 1 - Developer-Blog

Anyone have a guide to setting up and running a Bitcoin Unlimited node?

Hey All! It's time to launch some Bitcoin Unlimited nodes!
Let's have this thread dedicated to the creation and maintenance of Bitcoin Unlimited nodes! For any decent guide, I will add it to this post.
Also, please feel free to contribute a list of VPS/Dedicated Server providers that would be good for running nodes.
Official BU Download Site:
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
List of Service Providers: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1LoCyguoyoVSwvaCAfa9Ob_aQEm8wSnhEI5nKrIz_wZg/edit#gid=0
NOTE: This spreadsheet is read-only because there are malicious actors who would probably mess with it. To add to this spreadsheet, post information in this thread, and I will add it.
submitted by ugtarmas to btc [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Vertnode - An automated solution for installing Vertcoin node(s) on Single Board Computers

Hello Vertcoin Community,
Eager to contribute to the Vertcoin Community I began creating step by step walkthrough guides on how to get a Vertcoin node up and running on a Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero and Intel NUC. Along with information to get a Vertcoin node up and running was also optional steps to install p2pool-vtc.
I decided that while this step by step guide might be helpful to a few, a setup script may prove to be useful to a wider range of people. I have this script to a point where I think it may be productive to share with a bigger audience, for those who are brave and have this hardware sitting around or like to tinker with projects; I invite you to test this setup script if you are interested, if you run into errors any sort of verbose console output of the error proves to be extremely helpful in troubleshooting.
The script was designed to produce a “headless” server... meaning we will not be using a GUI to configure Vertcoin or check to see how things are running. In fact, once the server is set up, you will only interact with it using command line calls over SSH. The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Why run a headless node on a Single Board Computer?
The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Required: USB Flash Drive 6GB - 32GB
Please note that the script was designed for Single Board Computers first and looks for an accessible USB Flash Drive to use for storing the blockchain and swap file, as constant writing to a microSD can degrade the health of the microSD.
Supports

Hardware

All of the hardware listed above is hardware that I have personally tested / am testing on myself. The plan is to continue expanding my arsenal of single board computers and continue to add support for more hardware to ensure as much compatibility as possible.
Functionality
It is worth noting that LIT can be ran with multiple configurations, the ones displayed in the Post Installation Report reflect values that run LIT with the Vertcoin Mainnet. Please be aware that the Vertcoin Testnet chain has not been mined 100% of the time in the past, if you make transactions on the Vertcoin testnet that do not go through it is likely because the chain has stopped being mined.
BE CAREFUL WITH YOUR COINS, ONLY TEST WITH WHAT YOU ARE OKAY WITH LOSING IF YOU USE THE MAINNET.

Vertcoin Testnet Coins

https://tvtc.blkidx.org/faucet/
I've included some documentation on LIT I created which includes information I found to be useful: https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode/blob/mastedocs/lit.md
Please visit the mit-dci/lit github repository for the most up to date information on lit: https://github.com/mit-dci/lit

Vertnode | Automated Vertcoin Node Installation Script

https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode

Recommended: Use Etcher to install the chosen OS to your microSD card / USB flash drive.

If you intend on installing Ubuntu Server 16.04 to your Intel NUC please use Etcher to install the .iso to your USB flash drive.
https://etcher.io/
PLEASE NOTE THIS SCRIPT MAY GIVE AN ERROR. THIS IS THE NATURE OF TESTING. PLEASE REPORT YOUR ERRORS IF YOU WANT THEM TO BE FIXED/RESOLVED. THANK YOU FOR BETTERING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SCRIPT.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 Setup Details

You can use different clients to ssh into your node. One option is using PuTTY or Git Bash on Windows which is included in the desktop version of Git. If you are using Linux you can simply open a new terminal window and ssh to the IP address of your node (hardware you intend installing the Vertcoin node on).
You will need to know the IP address of your node, this can be found on your router page.
ssh 192.168.1.5 -l pi For example, this command uses ssh to login to 192.168.1.5 using the -l login name of pi. The IP address of your node will likely be different for you, in this example I am logging into a Raspberry Pi which has a default login name of pi.
A brief list of commands that can be used to check on the Vertcoin node status:
vertcoin-cli getblockchaininfo | Grab information about your blockchain
vertcoin-cli getblockcount | Grab the current count of blocks on your node
vertcoin-cli getconnectioncount | Grab the current count of connections to your node. A number of connections larger than 8 means that you have incoming connections to your node. The default settings are to make 8 outgoing connections. If you want incoming connections please port forward your Raspberry Pi in your Router settings page.
vertcoin-cli getpeerinfo | Grab the information about the peers you have connected to / are connected to
vertcoin-cli getnettotals | Grab network data, how much downloaded/upload displayed in bytes
tail -f ~/.vertcoin/debug.log | Output the latest lines in the Vertcoin debug.log to see verbose information about the Vertcoin daemon (ctrl+c to stop)
Thank you to all who have helped me and inspired me thus far, @b17z, @jamesl22, @vertcoinmarketingteam, @canen, @flakfired, @etang600, @BDF, @tucker178, @Xer0
This work is dedicated to the users of Vertcoin, thank you for making this possible.
7/20/2018 Thank you @CommodoreAmiga for the incredibly generous tip <3
You can reach me @Sam Sepiol#3396 on the Vertcoin Discord, here on reddit or @ [email protected]
submitted by ecorp-sam-sepiol to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Step by step in staking Redd with Raspberry Pi 3

Before I start, I would like to pay complete credits to these two guys :)
https://www.reddcointalk.org/topic/2679/reddcoin-staking-via-ubuntu-mate-on-raspberry-pi-3-model-b-march-2018 (most of my steps, if not all, are from this link)
https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/build-arm.md
All the steps I am writing is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY, please don't try to skip it because I did, and it doesn't work.
step 1: get a Raspberry Pi B https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/#buy-now-modal
step 2: make sure you get proper power supply 5v 2A - the Pi will mine, it will need sufficient power. Regular USB samsung charger will not work.
step 3: get proper micro SD card (SanDisk for example) 32Gb++
step 4: USB + Mouse keyboard
step 5: flash micro SD card with Ubuntu MATE
Download Ubuntu Mate image: https://ubuntu-mate.org/raspberry-pi/
Download Etcher: https://etcher.io
After finishing downloading, use Etcher to write/flash the image on micro SD card
After this, your SD card contains Ubuntu MATE OS.
step 6: Place SD Card into Raspberry Pi 3 and start it up. You should be able to see Ubuntu OS! Congrats!
step 7: Connect to wifi or internet cable (internet is better and faster)
step 8: OPTIONAL - turn off UI OS, so that things will work faster
Open XTerminal:
sudo systemctl disable lightdm.service (to turn UI off) 
in case you want to turn UI on again, run this:
sudo systemctl start lightdm.service (to turn UI on) 
step 9: install all dependencies
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install git build-essential libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libtool autotools-dev autoconf libssl-dev libboost-all-dev wget pkg-config sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install db4.8 sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev Reboot 
step 10: add additional RAM (sort of) in case the App need it, this is call "Create Swap file"
sudo fallocate -l 1G /swapfile sudo chmod 600 /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile sudo swapon /swapfile echo ‘/swapfile none swap sw 0 0’ | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab 
step 11: Build Berkeley Database
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar xfvz db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC cd build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
step 11.5: Set BerkeleyDB path
export CPATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include" export LIBRARY_PATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib/ 
step 12: Build Reddcoin Wallet
---download source code ---- only source from joroob/reddcoin will work because some stweak was needed for ARM CPU
cd ~ git clone https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin.git 
---build reddcoin ----
cd reddcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure --with-gui=no --disable-tests cd src make sudo make install 
If you finish this, you are in a great position!!!
step 13: Create reddcoin configuration file
cd ~ mkdir .reddcoin && cd .reddcoin nano reddcoin.conf rpcuser=YOUR OWN USERNAME, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT rpcpassword=YOUR OWN PASS WORD, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT 
step 14: Use bootstrap
(At this point, you had a running reddcoin daemon, now you can start staking. But syncing the full chain takes long time.)
cd ~/.reddcoin wget https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/releases/download/v2.0.1.2/bootstrap.dat.xz xz -d bootstrap.dat.xz 
step 15: start the reddcoin daemon service cd ~/reddcoin/src ./reddcoind -daemon
After this, you can test if the daemon is working, by perform this command: ./reddcoin-cli getblockcount
step 16: if your app is not able to sync, it is probably the firewall issue with OS, run this to allow port 45444 (used by Reddcoin) and redo step 15
sudo iptables -I INPUT 1 -i eth0 -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT 
step 17: open BEER and enjoy! This is a MUST or the daemon will stop working! I am not kidding!
step 18: Actually, i forgot to mention you need to execute this command for the wallet to stake:
reddcoind walletpassphrase $yourpassword 9999999 true 
ADDITIONAL REMARKS:
From my PC: I am using putty to execute the command, winSCP to monitor the file location on raspberry.
Moving Red Coins out of exchange really a big move, start with normal wallet, don't start with this tutorial :) Ever since I move my coins out of exchange, I am free from all of the ups and downs! Really!
So guys and gals, Redd On!
UPDATE 18 Mar: my first stake has arrived after 6 days staking :)
In case you want to tip me: RaF3TeWqgTzAdnaZQffnsxS74dag13zsAY
Edit 1: Format stuff
Edit 2: Add step 18 to execute staking command.
Edit 3: In case you don't want to compile the source code, you can download my compile version here: https://github.com/hieplenet/reddcoin/releases/tag/v2.0.0.0 (but doing this, you should be aware of the risk of me changing source code for my benefit - I don't change any thing, but you should be cautious, this is the internet :) )
submitted by hieplenet to reddCoin [link] [comments]

What kind of IOT data will be valuable to sell?

As you are aware, the data marketplace will be open to everyone eventually. I would like to invest in some mining equipment, of course not for Bitcoin/Altcoin mining but for data mining to collect data which could be sold in data.iota.org. For this, I would love to hear your advice on two subjects: the types of data that could be collected and the hardware platforms which would communicate with the tangle (or with a full node) to transfer the data through the tangle.

Data types

There are a lot of types of sensors. So I was wondering which type of data would have the most value to sell? Here are some data type examples I could find that can be calculated/retrieved with existent specialized hardware sensors:

Hardware platforms

What would you buy? I think the price of the computer, the amount of sensors that are embedded to or the amount of sensors that could be connected to and the energy efficiency are the most important aspects to look for. A few examples:
What do you think? In what would you invest? Btw, I'm not trying to become rich with this, it's just an experiment.
submitted by milad_nazari to Iota [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi Home Dashboard

I had a few requests of my home dashboard, and wanted to share with everyone how I put it together.
What you'll need:
Step 1: Instructions to Set Up the Raspberry Pi Itself:
Step 2: Set up the HTML File to Display
/home/pi/html
  1. Background.png
  2. Dashboard.html
  3. News.html
  4. Map.html
  5. Stocks.html
  6. ToDo.html
  7. Weather.html
  8. Calendar.html
FINAL Comments. This project probably took me 1h to set up the pi. And 4ish hours stumbling around to get the dashboard set up. My only real outlay was a monitor mount and a new monitor. Best of luck!
EDIT Here is the link for the current version of the dashboard. I removed the traffic for the weekend, but this is the dashboard. I have some formatting I really want to do (headings et al), but this should be a decent start. I have also included the color scheme I used.
submitted by fuzzyaces to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Beginner's guide to Myriad Mining 4: Raspberry Pi edition

Beginner's guide to Myriad Mining 4: Raspberry Pi edition!
 
Part 1 - Mining Myriad with your Desktop PC (CPU) is here: https://www.reddit.com/myriadcoin/comments/6jj5z5/beginners_guide_to_myriad_mining_using_you
 
Part 2 - Mining Myriad with your NVIDIA GPU is here: https://www.reddit.com/myriadcoin/comments/6jobfa/beginners_guide_to_myriad_mining_part_2_using/
 
Part 3 - Mining Myriad with your AMD GPU is here: https://www.reddit.com/myriadcoin/comments/6lsic9/beginners_guide_to_myriad_mining_part_3_using/
   
Requirements:
 
-A Raspberry Pi
-Keyboard, mouse, network cable
-A PC for the wallet
-SD card (8 GB+)
-Patience
 
I'm personally using a Pi 2, however I'd be interested to know if there are hurdles/hashrate differences with any of the other Pi models.
 
I also have a few Pi heatsinks on order, and it seems you may even be able to overclock your Pi for this - I'll have a look into this and report back if there is any interest in running the Pi mining, overclocked with a heatsink. Commonly these machines are used to control Bitcoin ASICs, so this should be interesting!
 
N.B. Some of the initial steps are similar (or even identical) to the earlier guides. I recommend reading through it from start to finish, even if you think you're far ahead of me - sometimes there's a simple error that can be corrected by making sure all the steps are done in order.
 
  1. Get your wallet: Click on one of the following links https://github.com/myriadteam/myriadcoin/releases/download/v0.11.3.2/myriad-0.11.3.2-win64-setup.exe (or https://github.com/myriadteam/myriadcoin/releases/download/v0.11.3.2/myriad-0.11.3.2-win32-setup.exe if your computer cannot run the first) to download the Myriad official wallet. Install it on your PC, follow the setup instructions, then click "receive". Enter a label and press "request payment". This will be your wallet address for your Pi. If you did this for the CPU, AMD, or NVIDIA mining guides, you can do it again - there's no harm in knowing exactly where the payments are coming from, and there's no limit to how many addresses you can make to request Myriad. I'm talking about "request payment" - you only need one wallet application!
  2. Sign up for an account on a mining pool that takes Myriadcoin - Yescrypt. "Yescrypt" is the code that allows your Pi to search for coins on the network, and should only work with a CPU (central processing unit). The one I've been using for my guides is https://miningpoolhub.com/ . Once you sign up, click "Myriadcoin - Yescrypt pool" on the left, then click on "workers". Add a new worker - I called my first one CPU1, CPU2 etc for each new CPU, then Pi1, Pi2 etc for each Raspberry Pi. Password doesn't matter. In the difficulty box, you can put "sd=0.01" for a Pi 2 - thanks smatdesa , however sometimes just leaving it to auto-adjust can work better.
  3. After this click "wallet" on the left. Enter your "payment address" from step 1 and your PIN, as well as "20" for automatic payout of coins you mine, so you see some coin in your wallet every day or two. Please note, some pools charge a fee for this. 0.1 is the fee for my pool, and I'm happy to pay it to have the coins safely with me, as I don't donate - I have far too few Myriad to do so.
  4. This is where the guide diverges from the previous guides. If you're following along at home, this is a good place to start if you're in a hurry to get mining.
  5. Download Raspbian from this link: https://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian_latest and click on "download ZIP under "Raspbian with desktop"(let me know if the link changes!). Whilst this is downloading, grab yourself a copy of 7-zip from www.7-zip.org ( http://www.7-zip.org/a/7z1604-x64.exe for 64-bit and http://www.7-zip.org/a/7z1604.exe for 32-bit ). If you don't know what "32-bit" or "64-bit" means, that's okay - generally, 64-bit should work fine.
  6. So, let's continue getting software ready. Install 7-zip by double-clicking on your downloaded file. Also grab yourself a copy of Etcher - for writing our Raspbian to our Pi SD card from this linK: https://etcher.io/ . Click "download for Windows x64". If this one doesn't work/install, click the little arrow to the right, and click "Etcher for Windows x64 (32-bit) (Installer).
  7. Now, with all of the required software in place to install Raspbian, let's write it to our SD card. Double click your Raspbian-Jessie .zip file, and drag the .img file inside into a foldeonto your desktop. After it extracts, open up your copy of Etcher, and click "select image" - pick the .img you just dropped. Select your SD card be careful here! make sure it's actually your SD card and click Flash.
  8. Start your Pi Once this is done, plonk your SD into your Pi, connect power, keyboard, mouse, and HDMI, and watch the pretty lights flashing! The next step is acquiring the mining software to get your Pi mining. On the desktop, which has a lovely picture of a road and some nature, if that's your thing. But we're here to get mining! Click on the fourth icon from the left (default) - Terminal - a little icon with a window and blue menu bar . You're presented with a CLI (command line interface) in lovely black and green.
 
Type the following into your CLI:
 
git clone https://github.com/tpruvot/cpuminer-multi
 
This should echo the following: "cloning into 'cpuminer-multi'...", and could potentially take a while - on my Pi 2 running Raspbian Jessie, it took me somewhere along the lines of half an hour for this step alone. You should end with "Checking out files: 100%" or something along these lines, and be returned to your blue $ CLI prompt. Next command is as follows:
 
sudo apt-get install automake autoconf pkg-config libcurl4-openssl-dev libjansson-dev libssl-dev libgmp-dev make g++
 
Hit "y" at the prompt to begin installation of the required packages.
 
The **next command happens to be the simple build command:
 
./build.sh
 
All done. Make yourself a cup of tea, and feel excited that your Pi is doing a thing (compiling). The next thing you know, it's all complete, and you're left staring at your lovely blue $ prompt. So let's get it working!
 
cd cpuminer-multi
 
This will get you into your folder. The following command should get you mining happily (yes!):
 
cpuminer -o stratum+tcp://hub.miningpoolhub.com:20577 -a yescrypt -u username.workername -p x -t 4
 
Explanation: We are using cpuminer to connect to the mining pool we joined in step 2. -a yescrypt is the algorithm we are using, username is the user name you joined the pool with, workername is the worker we added, all in step 2. -p is your password (it shouldn't matter - you could potentially put myriad2them00n, but let's not complicate things), and -t 4 is the number of threads - you can experiment with this, depending on your Pi - for my Pi 2, I get the most submitted shares with 4 threads.
 
Mining speed: To give you an idea of my experience: if you lined up 15 of these, all overclocked to 1 GHz, they would produce around the same hashrate as a modern i5 laptop (1.5 kH/s).
 
And that's it!. Shout out to smatdesa, who got me excited about working on this guide! Please post any new configurations, questions or comments below! Happy Myriad mining. And if your 3,166 Raspberry Pis are burning rubber and overflowing your coffers with XMY, or you just like what you see here, I'm humbly accepting: Donations (XMY only please):
 
MTeYZ6SQEKBCysTSf9LdW8rAxaahWSSvPd
submitted by MynaEradicator to myriadcoin [link] [comments]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: After Butterfly Labs collapses, engineers find new jobs at 21 Inc.

BEGIN BLOG POST

After Butterfly Labs collapses, engineers find new jobs at 21 Inc.

A bitcoin miner has shipped on time. Yes, that is news. A new venture-capital backed company, 21 Inc., has released a miniature bitcoin miner that they call a "Bitcoin computer". For $399.99, you get a Raspberry Pi, an SHA-256 ASIC board, and a giant fan.
Again, this is news: normally, a manufacturer of bitcoin miners would overdesign and underengineer their equipment, or, if they managed to ship something functional, it would be so poorly engineered -- and over budget -- that it be an explosion waiting to happen and/or priced comparably to a four-door sedan.
21 Inc. has done something remarkable in the Bitcoin world: they started a company that operates like a legitimate business. They're even listed on Amazon.com, a company that's so strict with vendors that Nintendo was kicked off their system for not kissing enough customer ass.
Okay, enough with the praise.

This thing sucks.

The 21.co "computer" certainly deserves a place in the VC world, along with the other products consisting of wild promises and inane use cases. For the price of 4 Raspberry Pi computer kits, you get the following:
(If you have a remote desire to develop applications that use bitcoin, stop here. Go through that list and buy just those items above. You don't need anything else. If you're looking for comedy, or if you're a sucker with too much money, read on...)

Is that all I get for my money?

Those products alone don't allow you to make Bitcoin applications, apparently. You need these things, too:

How about the software demos?

It's difficult to justify developing a $400 computer that can't do much. So, to entice some customers, 21 Inc. included demos that try really hard to make customers feel inspired. Here are just a few things that 21 Inc. claims were totally impossible before their product existed:

What are the real customers saying?

The packaging is slick:
"This @21dotco computer came already opened..."
The hardware is reliable:
"...it must have lost power, which caused my SSH keys to become corrupted."
The software is revolutionary:
"...it will be more expensive to pay for your spotify subscription via your electricity bill, but a lot of people don't care."

I want to buy it anyway!

Go ahead. I won't stop you. Oh, and 21 Inc. doesn't accept bitcoins.
END BLOG POST
submitted by theirmoss to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Why using an ASIC for mining lottery?

https://solo.nicehash.com why do I need an asic for the mining lottery offered here? At least the rasperry pi guide (https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/seans-diy-bitcoin-lottery/) suggests using one. Why tho? Shouldn't the hash rate be irrelevant here?
submitted by Lokart to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

PiMining Any Good?

I know RaspberryPi isn’t profitable when mining Bitcoin but what’s it like? Anyone know wether it’s worth investing into for a first mining rig?
submitted by benwatten1 to ElectroneumMining [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi 3 - as computer with GPUs connected via USB Risers

The motivation for this post is that I've seen that people have used RPI with usb bitcoin miners or at least something of that sort. And I thought to myself would this be able to work with Ethos as a way of have a more energy efficient miner. I saw that a few posts have referenced the following thread on stack exchange:
https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/12999/connect-a-gpu-into-raspberry-pi
I know that I would have to find a way to power the GPUs, but I was thinking using a server PSU such as described here:
https://www.reddit.com/EtherMining/comments/6cx30t/stop_wasting_your_money_on_expensive_powe
To get around the driver issues couldn't I install ethOS or find a way to make a distro of linux to work even if it's just CLI? The reason I am wondering is that I already have 3 RPI laying around that would be cool to repurpose as mining rigs. I also think it would be a cool learning experience. Thoughts and comments are more than appreciated! (:
submitted by Digitizkilla to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Zeus/Gaw ASIC Setup Guide for Linux/Raspberry Pi

So I recently I became quite interested in mining and cyptocurrencies in general. So interested in fact that I bit the bullet and decided to buy myself a GAW Fury.
I then spent some time doing research on how to set up a GAW or Zeus ASIC on Linux, in particular on a Raspberry Pi, and have found most guides to be awful. The reason they are so bad IMHO is that they assume quite a bit of prior knowledge, either with Linux or mining, and give very little instructions. So I have tried to put together a guide that requires very little prior knowledge.
It is my aim that anyone could get their shiny new asic up and mining in no time using this guide. Anyway, I present...

The Complete Noobs Guide to Setting Up a Zeus or Gaw ASIC on Debian/Ubuntu/Raspberry Pi

Resources

About Cyrptocurrencies and Their Jargon

If you are new to cryptocurrencies and how they work I suggest taking a look at this series of KhanAcademy videos. They are for Bitcoin but the theory is the same. I found them very helpful when it came to understanding what mining actually does and the mechanics of cyrptocurrencies.
Also take a look at sircamm22 his info found here, is great and breaks down a large number of concepts. I slightly disagree with no. 21 regarding preordering. Just exercise common sense.

Linux

If you are new to Linux you could follow along by simply typing in the commands. However I highly recommend taking the time to learn what you are doing. This course is a great place to start.

Computer Setup

By the end of this section you will have your device turned on, fully setup and connected to the internet with.
Note: Commands to be typed into the command line will be displayed like this:
echo Hello World

Desktop/Laptop

For laptops and desktops already running Ubuntu or Debian I will assume you have setup your internet setup as part of the installation.
If not: There are plenty of guides out there and the installation/setup process is very easy. A good place to start for Ubuntu is here.
Now open up a terminal window. Ctrl + alt + t on a standard Ubuntu installation.
If you plan on using this PC without a monitor I would suggest installing an SSH Server.
These commands will be discussed later on in the guide.
sudo apt-get -y install openssh-server
sudo service openssh-server start

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has put together a great guide in PDF format.
Use NOOBS it will save you a lot of trouble. NB: Some SD cards don't support NOOBs but will work fine if the image is put on using a different method.
Here is a great guide for setting up the Raspberry Pi SD card from Elinux.org. In fact it's a great place to start for anything RPi related. Raspberry Pi hub at Elinux.
Once the SD card is setup you will need to insert it into the Raspberry Pi and boot. Install Raspbian from the NOOBs menu and wait.
Follow this guide by Adafruit for first time setup. You will need to enable SSH Server.
I suggest not starting the desktop on boot. It can be easily run from the command line by typing startx.
Follow this guide by Adafruit to setup your network. Found here. No need to do this if you set up previously in the first time config.
We will also at this point want to setup ssh. Again I will point you to an Adafruit guide.
Once done exit back to a standard command line interface. This can be done in LXDE by using the power off menu located in the bottom right corner.

Miner Setup

Installing BFGMiner

If you want to the Raspberry Pi or PC without a monitor go ahead and SSH into your device.
So now you should be staring at a command line interface whether on the device with a monitor or via SSH.
First things first lets make sure we are all up to date. This will update our package list from the repositories and upgrade them to the newest version. "-y" Will simply say yes to any prompts.
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y upgrade
We are going to need to install some useful tools. Git-core is how we will clone and download BFGMiner from GitHub and Screen allows multiple command line instances and means if we exit out of ssh session or quit Terminal on Ubuntu, BFGMiner will continue to run.
sudo apt-get install git-core screen
We also need to download some other tools/dependencies to ensure that BFGMiner will compile successfully.
sudo apt-get -y install build-essential autoconf automake libtool pkg-config libcurl4-gnutls-dev libjansson-dev uthash-dev libncursesw5-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libevent-dev libmicrohttpd-dev libc-bin
Ok now change into your home directory.
cd ~
And clone BFGMiner by Darkwinde.
git clone https://github.com/Darkwinde/bfgminer.git
Once the download has completed move into the bfgminer directory.
cd bfgminer
The following steps may take a while.
Now run autogen.sh
sudo ./autogen.sh
You will need to make the configure script execuitable.
sudo chmod +x ./configure
Now configure bfgminer
sudo ./configure CFLAGS="-O3" --enable-scrypt
Now lets make!
sudo make
Install BFGMiner
sudo make install
One more thing...
sudo ldconfig

Running BFGMiner

If you haven't already plug in your ASIC.
Just confirm your system is recognising the ASIC.
lsusb
Its output should look similar to this (no need to type this in):
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 10c4:ea60 Cygnal Integrated Products, Inc. CP210x UART Bridge / myAVR mySmartUSB light
Yep there it is our ASIC listed as device 005. There is no need to install any drivers, unlike in windows, as they come in the kernel.
Now lets actually start BFGMiner.
You will want to start a screen session to ensure BFGMiner doesn't quite when you exit.
"-S" is the option for starting a new screen session. You can replace "miner" with anything you like.
screen -S miner
Now you can run the commands below.
Here is a sample of what you should type. You will need to replace somethings with your own values.
sudo bfgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://URL:PORT -u USERNAME -p PASSWORD --zeus-cc CHIPCOUNT --zeus-clk 328 -S zeus:/dev/ttyUSB0
Where:
URL:PORT is the address and port of the pool you wih to use. Now I won't suggest a pool. I will leave that decision up to you. If you do wish to mine DOGE take a look at this site for a list of pools and comparisons.
USERNAME this is the username you use on the pool. Every pool is different. Check your pool's website for details. PASSWORD same as above. Specific to your pool, not every pool requires one.
CHIPCOUNT this is specific to which ASIC you are using.
For GAWMiner ASIC's:
  • War Machine: 256
  • Falcon: 128
  • Black Widow: 64
  • Fury: 6
For ZeusMiner ASIC's:
  • Blizzard: 6
  • Cyclone: 96
  • Hurricane X2: 48
  • Hurricane X3: 64
  • Thunder X2: 96
  • Thunder X3: 128
Now to make sure you don't stop mining when you exit ssh or terminal. Press:
ctrl + a + d
To come back to the BFGMiner screen simply run:
screen -r miner
You're done!!

Start on Boot

First off you will want to make sure you have BFGMiner running correctly. Ensure you have the miners set up properly and your pool correctly configured.
Start a BFGMiner instance, detailed above.
Once the instance has started and you are happy with how everything is working press "s" on your keyboard to enter the settings menu.
Now press the "w" key. Don't press enter. We want to specify where our config will go. Type:
/home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Substitute USERNAME for your user. On a standard RPI install its pi. On ubuntu it's what you set during the instillation.
Now press the enter key to return back to the main BFGMiner screen. Press "q" on your keyboard to exit BFGMiner. You should now be back in the command line.
Now we want to edit a file called rc.local. Any commands in this file will be executed on boot.
sudo nano /etc/rc.local
Depending on your system this file may already contain some commands. Be careful not to delete them.
After the last command and before "exit 0" type the following on one line:
sudo -u USERNAME screen -d -m sudo bfgminer --config /home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Where USERNAME = your username
Hit ctrl + x then y to save and exit nano.
The above command will create a new screen session and run bfgminer using the config we created earlier. All while as our username so that we can easily reattach.
Lets reboot to ensure it is working correctly:
sudo reboot
Once rebooted and logged in, show all running screen sessions:
screen -ls
Reattach to the session. You only need to use the numbers before the first dot.
e.g Mine looks like: 2480..hostname (13/07/14 12:02:09) (Detached). So I type:
screen -r 2480
Verify everything worked as expected. Then ctrl + a + d to exit.
You have now setup BFGMiner to restart on reboot.

Power Failure

If you are using a Raspberry Pi and it loses power it will automatically reboot on receiving power again.
For standard desktop PCs there is an option in some BIOS/UEFI to turn the computer on when it receives power. Consult your motherboard's manual and manufacturer's website.

Sources

Here is where I got my info from.
And of course /dogemining

Wrap Up

Congrats you've done it. You have managed to successfully get your shiny new asic mining away.
I do plan to make another guide detailing how to setup and use StarMiner a ready to go RPi mining distro.
So I hope this is helpful for you guys. I have seen lots of posts asking the exact same questions again and again and I have tried to answer these as best I can. I am still learning about this stuff so if there is something I have missed or a mistake I have made please tell me.
Anyway good luck. And I'll see you at the moon.
Cheers Frogsiedoodle
Edit 1: Layout and formatting.
Edit 2: Added instructions for screen which I initially forgot.
Edit 3: Removed 1 unneeded dependency
Edit 4: Added section on start on reboot and power failure.
submitted by Frogsiedoodle to dogemining [link] [comments]

Enigmabox - First Impressions / Review

I am not affiliated with Verein Enigmabox. I am just a geek into meshnets.

Background

I'm an IT Security analyst with a interest in cryptography, cipherpunk, darknets, meshnets, and a lot more geeky things that are not worth mentioning. I only have 15000 characters in this text box! :-)
I run a hyperboria node VPS and a couple of raspberry pis that are peered with my small mesh so when I stumbled across the Enigmabox my interest was piqued.
The Enigmabox is a small embedded PC in red aluminum case with a silkscreen logo and writing. It has three Ethernet ports, and two USB ports, an RS-232 port, and a power connector.
It's administered via the web. Eth0 has a static IP of 192.168.100.1 and Eth1 has a static IP of 192.168.101.1. Eth2 is your public/ WAN port.
It can either be used as a CJDNS node or can connect up to a CJDNS-based VPN run by the folks at Enigmabox.
It costs €575.00 which includes one-year of VPN access. As of this writing you have a choice of VPN exit nodes in:
Enigmabox claims 40mbits of throughput, but on my 50/16 Comcast Business Cable connection I am getting 14/10 out the US endpoint.
The box is designed to be set up and used as the gateway for your computer, or for your entire network. I set mine up as the gateway for my entire network.
I had no problems last night watching Netflix or Hulu Plus on my Roku box. This was while several other high-bandwidth activities were also going on from other devices on my network.
This morning however I noticed that the internet connection dropped for the US endpoint so I had to switch to the German one. I'm not sure if that was a problem local to the VPN concentrator or if I actually got flagged and banned for excessive bandwidth usage.
Later on this afternoon I was able to switch back to the US endpoint which is good because my Company geoblocks network activity from pretty much every country's IP-space other than the US and Canada.

The Ordering Process

I found the ordering process to be a bit cumbersome and arcane to be honest. There were issues with the order form, and my only two payment options were bitcoins or wire transfer.
I would have felt much more comfortable spending €575.00 had I could have paid with either a credit card or hell — even PayPal!
On the plus side, I got to learn just how much more arcane and byzantine wiring money from one's credit union in the United States to a bank in Switzerland and converting the currency from USD to Euros could actually be.
I can't wait for BitCoin to become the de-factor currency for ecommerce, but I don't have hundreds of dollars or euros tied up in any online or offline wallet to have made that practical. And if I'm going to spend several (several) hundred dollars for an item call me crazy but I do like the consumer protections that my credit card affords me.
I placed my order on June 19th. I wired the funds on June 19th. My credit union told me the funds would be made available to the Enigmabox guys on July 2nd.
On July 3rd I inquired with the Enigmabox guys and asked them if they had received the funds wired and received a response that my order had already shipped.
On July 18th I inquired with Enigmabox again to inquire if there was a tracking number available and was told there was none and that I should just wait and be patient.
It was at this point that I really started to get a very bad feeling that I had just pissed-away several hundred euros and that I needed to prepare myself for the fact that I had been scammed.
I let the Enigmabox guys know this and also expressed how surprised I was that no tracking number was created and nor was the box insured. I wasn't only just talking about my protection, but what about the sellers' protection too?
This is like selling and shipping 101. You get a tracking number. You insure it. If the package had gotten lost in-transit, misdelivered, or if I was a scammer I could have simply said I never received it. There would have been no proof.
The package arrived yesterday and was delivered by my postal carrier.

The Contents of the Box

The box arrived with the following contents:
  • Enigmabox
  • USB Stick with X.509 certificates that I assume are my VPN credentials.
  • UK/EU style wall-wart power adapter
  • UK/EU wall-wart 220vAC outlet to US 115vAC outlet adapter
  • Ethernet Cable
  • Single sheet providing quick setup instructions
  • Grandstream VoIP Phone
  • UK/EU style wall-wart power adapter
  • UK/EU wall-wart 220vAC outlet to US 115vAC outlet adapter
  • Ethernet Cable
  • User Manual for VoIP Phone

Initial Setup

The initial setup was straight forward. Plug cablemodem into the Internet port. Plug LAN port into my switch.
DHCP assigned an IP address and local DNS.
Opened a web browser to http://box.enigmabox.net.

Thoughts and Issues

I found the Enigmabox to be very well constructed. The inclusion of adapters for US plugs was a welcome surprise.
The inclusion of a VoIP phone I found to be excessive. It would make much more sense to lower the price a bit and let the end-user supply their own phone.
Surfing the net has been painless and everything just works.
No ports are exposed on the Enigmabox to the Internet and the box itself is running a stripped-down version of Linux. The root shell was ash which was nice surprise. I was expecting busybox to be honest.

Pros

The box and project seem pretty mature and well thought out. The VPN service seems solid for the most part, and it has held up to some bandwidth intensive applications.
I'm not a gamer so I can't describe lag times.
The software comes with an embedded version of Asterisk to facilitate the VoIP communication, a mini- webserver, DokuWiki (which I applaud their choice there!), an Email server, roundcube webmail, and a twitter-like clone.

Cons

The ordering process leaves a LOT to be desired.
Limited payment options could be a deterrent to some customers.
The fact that the device and box was shipped with no insurance and no tracking is ludicrous.
Documentation is non-existent. The online wiki/ FAQ is incomplete.
And there is no support. No forum. No mailing list.
I've got some questions about some of the config options and some things I'm seeing and experiencing and I have no idea who to ask for thoughts or suggestions.

Conclusion

Is it worth €575? No. But it's also worth noting that of that €575, about 1/3 of that is for one year of VPN service.
It's like €132 for the year (or maybe that was $132). Even that is a bit over priced especially when Private Internet Access is $40 for the year.
But I get that there's economies of scale and that hopefully that price will come down. After all, 132 a year is only 11 a month, and that's not that unreasonable when you look at things that way.
My suggestion? Get yourself a RaspberryPi or a BananaPi and build your own.
And sign up for the VPN access to help support the project.
It's a cool project.
Now if only I could figure out how to connect up to some hyperboria sites. :-) I'm peered with a couple of nodes on hyperboria but nothing is loading. Hell, I can't even load any of the hypesites that are part of the Enigmabox network.
Time to fork the code on github and start reading!
Cheers.
Edit: A word here and there.
submitted by gellenburg to darknetplan [link] [comments]

Guide For New Shibes

So it has become apparent to me from the constant questions on this subreddit that a lot of new miners/shibes need help, so I have decided to make a basic guide to most of the questions I see a lot here.
1) BTC - This means Bitcoin so If you see a miner that says BTC it does not work with dogecoin because dogecoin is Scrypt.
2) Scrypt - This is what dogecoin runs off of, or what your computeasic/gpu solves to support the network.
3) Asic - This stands for an application-specific integrated circuit, or in less confusing terms a miner dedicated completely to mining a particular type of coin such as dogecoin.
4) GPU Mining - Using a graphics card to mine crypto currencies.
5) CPU Mining - A slow and inefficient way of using your computers Central Processing Unit to mine crypto currencies.
6) Hash Rate - The rate at which you mine a crypto currency. The higher the better.
7) KH - This Means Kilo Hashes. 1KH = 1,000 Hashes a Second
8) MH - This Means Mega Hash - 1 MH = 1,000,000 hashes a second.
9) Should I buy an asic? - If you want to support the network yes. If you want to solely make money off of it No. Buy the coin if you want to make profit. This is my opinion, there is no one answer to this question.
10) Mining Pool - Pooled mining is a mining approach where multiple generating clients contribute to the generation of a block, and then split the block reward according the contributed processing power. Pooled mining effectively reduces the granularity of the block generation reward, spreading it out smoothly over time.
Tl/DR You Work with other miners to solve stuff faster making you money faster.
11) Mining Difficulty - How hard it is to solve the problems to generate dogecoin.
12) Do I need a fan? - Yes I cannot stress how important it is to properly cool your units. Make sure your units are always cool or else they might melt. Do not think you are safe just because you turn your ac up, but a fan.
13) What Mining Pool Should I Pick? - Here is a list of all of the pools Pick one that works for you.
14) What is a wallet? - This is where you store your dogecoin and where you can send and receive dogecoin.
15) What Wallet Should I get? - Online is convenient but not safe. Paper Is the Safest But Not convenient. Cold Storage is the mostly safe and somewhat convenient.
16) What is cold storage? - Basically putting your wallet on an offline device like a usb.
17) Can I mine on a mac? - Yes look here for more info.
18) Cloud Mining - A service you buy that mines for you. you pay for a certain amount of hashes, lets just say 10gh for an example, and the company/service mines you this amount for the time you bought. It is not profitable usually.
19) What Is a Raspberry Pi? - A small cheap computer that people use to run their miners on.
20) Watts - The measure of electricity.
21) Should I pre-order? No Never F%&$ing pre order, you will get scammed 99.9999% of the time.
22) Can I still mine? - Yes, you probably wont make money but you will support the doge community.
23) Linux - An operating system like windows that people use to run mining programs on.
24) If you Have an animal make sure to properly protect your mining rig from them. Wires from the machines make great chew toys.
25) How Do I calculate if im going to make money with my mining rig? - Use This mining Calculator This is also a very good calculator
26 What Mining Program Should I use? Windows: CG MINER Mac: Astroid Linux: CG Miner again
Goodluck mining I hope this helps. This Also Took A long time to make so support would be appreciated :)
submitted by sircam22 to dogemining [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi + ASIC defcoin mining guide

Want to get started mining defcoin with an ASIC and a Raspberry Pi? Does 360 KH/s of mining power sound appealing? Here’s how to do it.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Blpj8IvCcAEIStY.jpg
1) Hardware List
-Raspberry Pi Model B
--SD Card
--Micro USB power supply
--Ethernet cable
-Gridseed ASIC
--12V power supply (5.5mm/2.5mm barrel connector)
--USB to Mini USB data cable
The main component is the Gridseed ASIC, which will be doing the Scrypt calculations. The Raspberry Pi will be used as the controller for the ASIC, and will be doing the communication with the mining pool. If you’re not familiar with the term, an ASIC is an Application-Specific Integrated Circuit - basically a chip with a single purpose, like mining crypto currency. Using an ASIC will allow us to mine more efficiently than we would be able to with general purpose hardware.
The ASIC that I’m using is a “300+ KH/s Single Gridseed ASIC Miner”. It looks like a CPU heatsink with a fan attached. There is actually a circuit board with 5 ASIC chips sandwiched between two halves of this heatsink, and has a mini USB connector and a power connector sticking out the side. There are a few places where you can buy these. I bought mine at GAWMiners.com for $130. That was the lowest price that I could find, and I had a good experience buying from them. Use this link, and you can get $20 off of a $200 order (and give me some referral points :-)) GAWMiners. You can also find other vendors by searching for “Gridseed ASIC”. You’ll need a 12V power supply to power the ASIC, and a USB A to USB Mini B cable to connect the ASIC to the Raspberry Pi. I’m using a 60W power supply, which seems to be working fine for defcoin (Scrypt) mining. These ASICs can also mine Bitcoin at the same time, but you may need a beefier power supply if you want to do that.
The Raspberry Pi can be purchased at any number of places- Amazon, SparkFun, AdaFruit, etc. I’m using the Model B because I had one already, and also because it has a built in ethernet port that will make connecting to the internet easy. Make sure to get an SD Card and a micro USB power adapter to get the Pi up and running too.
2) Software
If you haven’t already, download the defcoin wallet from defcoin.org. If you want to do pooled mining, create an account for one of the defcoin pools, such as redbaron.us or whichever other pool you want to mine. Once you’ve created a pool account, make sure to create a worker too (for MPOS pools, that will be under My Account > My Workers). The password for your worker does not have to be the same as the password for your pool account (and it probably shouldn’t be).
Next, download the latest Raspbian image from raspberrypi.org/downloads/ and install the image to your SD card. Instructions for installing the image can be found here. If you are using the dd method on a Mac, make sure to use /dev/rdiskX instead of /dev/diskX - both will work, but rdiskX is much faster. Once you have the image installed, put the SD card in the Raspberry Pi, connect the Pi to your network, and connect the Pi to your micro USB power adapter to power it on. Next, SSH in to your Raspberry Pi with the default username and password pi/raspberry. I use nMap to find the IP address that has been assigned to my Pi. You can also use an HDMI display and a USB keyboard to log in instead of using SSH. After logging in for the first time, run through the wizard that comes up to configure your Raspberry Pi. The defaults are fine for most things, just make sure that you don’t skip the step to expand the filesystem to use the rest of your SD card. If you don’t expand the filesystem, there won’t be enough space for other software.
Once you have Raspbian installed, and have gotten through all of the first login setup stuff (which will likely end with a reboot), log back in to the Raspberry Pi with the pi user. From the command line, run sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
There are some stability issues with USB communication between the Raspberry Pi and the Gridseed ASIC. Enabling SLUB debugging seems to resolve this, at least well enough to prevent the Raspberry Pi from freezing every so often. Open the /boot/cmdline.txt file, and add the following text to the end of the line. Don’t add a new line, just add this to the end. You can use vi, nano, or whatever your favorite text editor is to do this.
slub_debug=FP 
Reboot the Raspberry Pi once you’ve added that flag to your /boot/cmdline.txt file.
sudo shutdown -r now 
Log back in with the pi user once the Raspberry Pi is finished rebooting.
The mining software that we’re going to use is a customized version of cgminer that has support for the Gridseed GC3355 chips that are used in our ASIC. There are a number of different mining programs out there, this is just what has been working the best for me so far. First, install git and dependencies needed to compile cgminer.
sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool libcurl4-openssl-dev libncurses5-dev libudev-dev autoconf automake 
Next, clone the git repository for cgminer-gc3355
git clone https://github.com/dtbartle/cgminer-gc3355.git 
Next, we’ll build cgminer.
cd cgminer-gc3355 autoreconf -i ./configure --enable-scrypt --enable-gridseed make 
Once the make command finishes, we’re ready to run the mining software. You can also run make install if you want to install the software, but running it out of the build directory works just fine. Plug in the power supply for your ASIC, and connect the ASIC to it. Connect the USB cable to the ASIC and to your Raspberry Pi. Run the mining software by running the following command. The -o option specifies your pool URL, the -u option specifies your username and the workername that you set up for the pool, and the -p option is the password for your worker. There are a couple of options available that are specific to the gridseed ASICs, and those will be placed after --gridseed-options. The freq=850 option sets the clock frequency of the ASIC to 850 MHz. There are other clock options available, but 850 seems to be working best for me. I was getting hardware errors at 900, and a lower average hash rate. I am getting about 360 KH/s with the clock frequency set to 850.
sudo ./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 
This command needs to be run with sudo in order to access the USB hardware. You can also create another user specifically for mining, or grant the pi user the appropriate permissions if you don’t want to run cgminer as root. When you run this command, you should see output from cgminer showing that it is communicating with the mining pool, and something showing your hash rate. If you’ve gotten this far, and you’re seeing output from cgminer showing a hash rate, congratulations, you’re mining defcoins with your ASIC! There are just a couple more steps to do if you want to let your Raspberry Pi and ASIC continue mining without needing you to be logged in.
To keep cgminer running after I log out, I am using nohup. You could also use screen instead of nohup. Create a script (startMiner.sh) by running the following commands.
echo “nohup /home/pi/cgminer-gc3355/cgminer --real-quiet -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 &” > /home/pi/startMiner.sh chmod a+x /home/pi/startMiner.sh 
If you run this command with sudo startMiner.sh, cgminer will run in the background, and will continue running after you log out. If you want to have this run when your Raspberry Pi boots, modify your /etc/rc.local script so that it executes this startMiner.sh script. Your /etc/rc.local file will end up looking like this:
# Print the IP address _IP=$(hostname -I) || true if [ "$_IP" ]; then printf "My IP address is %s\n" "$_IP" fi /home/pi/startMiner.sh exit 0 
That’s it! You should now have a Raspberry Pi controlling a defcoin mining ASIC, that starts mining as soon as it boots up. For more reading, check out some of the links below.
Gridseed GC3355 5 Chip Setup writeup on bitcointalk
cgminer-gc3355
Crypto Mining Blog
GAWMiners
raspberrypi.org
There are also some pre-built images for using a Raspberry Pi as an ASIC mining controller. I haven’t tried any of these myself, but they could be worth checking out. Raspberry Pi Controller Images with Gridseed ASIC Support
submitted by _RedBaron_ to defcoin [link] [comments]

State of the Redd-Nation :: Apr 04, 2016

Reddcoin Weekly Development Update

Welcome again Reddheads to another weekly update of Reddcoin Development.
This last weeks efforts have continued to focus on the requirements for the ReddID and services. Additionally, there has been a renewed interest overall with Reddcoin, which has seen some old wallets coming back online. This has required a bit of effort to help some users getting their wallets operating again.
Still there are some activities to complete on the v2 wallet before I am happy to create a more general release, with language translations forming the bulk of the work to do. Suffice to say, I am somewhat pedantic to make sure everything is covered, especially since our audience covers many different nationalities.
Some discussions have also been raised on how to create further incentive to promote and support the network. And do we have a plan for such activities?

New Wallet - RC1d development update

The work this last week has focused on network resilience and language files.
Some of the extreme testing done on testnet has been putting nodes off-line for extended periods so that they fall behind by greater than 24hrs, and then establishing the network again. Testing was passed.
Language translation is a focal point of mine for the release of the new wallet. And having an interface that can be read in your native language is a better user experience than relying on falling back to English. We live in a global village so the UI (user interface) should be accessible to all.
After reviewing past work, I think we can leverage some of the translation work done in BTC core to transfer into Reddcoin, and this will make the translation process more of a review for 22 language files which are 100% complete. Thanks @thijs for the discussion on this
I will be putting some focus this week in getting the updated resources pushed to the transifex site

Translations

One of the activities that needs to be done is to review the current translations for Reddcoin V2.0. We follow the same procedure as Bitcoin, using a service by Traniflex to manage and maintain the translation files. As mentioned, I will be working on updating some of the resource files this week to help expedite the process.
We have already had a good start on the following languages
I would also like to get some focus on the following languages, which for some will be a review of work already done:
Of course your welcome to contribute to any other of the languages as well. We currently have 60 languages on file, and you can add to this if needed (Klingon anyone??)
PM me if you are interested (we have already had some starters)

ReddID Updates

I have been keeping generally pretty quite on the progress of ReddID as I want to focus on getting the core wallet completed. That said, there is still some good progress occurring and the basic functionality is now available including backend services, an API to integrate with (3rd Party services) and integrating with wallet services. There is still a ways to go, but I am excited by the progress being made.

Getting involved

Community awareness is still increasing at a steady rate, and statistically we are back at the levels seen in early 2015. The number of active nodes, google search trends and Reddcoin marketcap have all been increasing from October 2015. The big difference is the trend is in a positive direction.
Some of my goals this year are to increase traffic to each of our forum areas (including Reddit, ReddCoinTalk
2 weeks ago we experienced a small blip on the exchanges, and this was followed again by another blip this week where nearly 900BTC was traded on Poloniex during the 24hrs on Apr 2.
I am looking forward to an exciting year in 2016.
If you would like to get involved and dont know where to start, reach out and we will see where you can jump in

Rewards + Full-Nodes + Network Support

I am going to borrow the title from the posting on Reddit since it was raised there this week by @appleluckyapple (appleluckyapple)
When PoSV was introduced to the community in August 2014, it was done with a built in reward rate of approximately 5% per annum return on staking. It is considered a modest inflation rate in which to reward users who continue to keep their wallets online and staking.
The questions raised was if there is consideration for any of the following
  1. Boosting the reward for staking
  2. Introducing staking requirements for boosted rewards (similar to masternodes)
  3. Incentivizing network support
This could form the basis of a very long thread, but it is worth discussing so you know where the teams headspace is at. These very questions are often on our minds when we consider the on going health of the network
At the current exchange rate of 9-10sat with 100MM coins staking you would earn approx 5MM RDD which at todays rates would be $USD210 (assuming no change in the exchange rate)
So it would cost an initial $USD4172 to purchase 100MM RDD, with a return of $USD210. Interest is compounded
In Australia a return from the banks at this rate would be considered very generous (typically rates are 1.5% - 3%). In Russia, you can get up to 10% And in UK, you could expect to get 1.4%
It is my opinion, that 5% is a healthy middle ground, that provides some reward to operators of staking nodes. As indicated, you do need to be staking a reasonable amount to get any significant return.

But, is it enough??

If you consider for a moment, running a full Bitcoin node, you could expect to earn 0 BTC for your outlay. Which I think is one of the failings of the Bitcoin eco-system. There should also be an incentive for operators to support their full node requirements. Bitcoin miners receive the proceeds of mining a block, AND the transaction fees.
With Reddcoin, we have combined the functions. Node operators can be both 'miners' and full node operators. We don't need expensive mining equipment, with a home PC or even RaspberryPI being sufficient to handle the task of being a full node and staking. Additionally, when staking, if you stake a block that contains transaction fees, you also receive those fees.

How could this be increased??

One of the goals of the ReddID implementation is to provide a method to fund additional payments into the network.
Since the ReddID system was first announced Social-X architecture by Laudney, I have been thinking on a deeper enhanced solution to improve the support of the network.
In regards to this discussion, I would like to single out the items regarding ReddID registration fees. This list differs somewhat from the original proposal.
The overall goal is to create a dynamic crypto ecosystem to enhance the PoSV system and provide a means to transfer value between users.

The future

Although I did not touch on any of the points presented in the Reddit OP. I would not dismiss any of the ideas as not being valid, each has merit in their own right.
I have not presented a roadmap yet for Reddcoin, but 2016 has a lot to offer. With the new wallet, ReddID and tipping platform we have some exciting features to launch this year.

In Closing

Every week that passes a little more gets achieved, between the efforts of the Core team and the contributing community members we are getting a lot done. Sometimes it is hard to see this if you are not seeing the output (new exes, source code, etc) but it all will arrive in good time. Going into this week, I hope to tick off a few more from of my activities list.
Where ever you are, enjoy your week ahead
Keep on staking!
x-posted on (https://www.reddcointalk.org/topic/815/state-of-the-redd-nation-apr-04-2016)
submitted by cryptognasher to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Is ASICMiner worth it ?

Hello, I'm new to Bitcoin mining, I mine with my GTX 750 Ti, just for fun, just to test :) I mine at 170 Mhash/s. I have a RaspberryPi but I don't use it, and I wanted to transform it into a little Bitcoin miner with ASICMiner (ASICMiner Block Erupter USB 330MH/s Sapphire Miner) like that: http://www.amazon.com/ASICMiner-Block-Erupter-USB-Sapphire/dp/B00CUJT7TO
So I wanted to ask; Is it worth it ?
Cordially, bmx22c.
submitted by bmx22c to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Mining on a RaspberryPi

I'm new to Bitcoin Mining and I'm thinking of using a RasberryPi to get myself started. I've done a little bit of research and seen some USB ASICs, but I was wondering if I could run it on a RasberryPi alone.
I know this probably isn't an ideal way of doing it, and at the moment I'm only looking at it as something to keep me busy on my days off.
The reason I've chosen to use a RaspberryPi over my laptop or desktop is it's very low power, doesnt make a lot of heat (compared to my laptop or desktop) and I can leave it running for long periods of time without worrying too much about it.
Any suggestions on how I could get started are welcome =)
submitted by TCMStryder to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

How to make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Rig - YouTube 8 Raspberry Pi 3’s With CPU Miner Installed Hooked Up To A 5 Volt 20 AMP Power Supply. 4 GH/s Raspberry PI Bitcoin Miner - PiMiner - YouTube Raspberry Pi 3+ Bitcoin Mining (Bitmain AntMiner U3) Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining For 12 Hours! - YouTube

And it turns out that the Pi is a very cheap and efficient way to control and monitor devices which are better suited to mining Bitcoins – like the new, thumb-drive-sized ASIC Bitcoin miners that have started appearing on the market recently, which mine at a similar rate to a fast graphics card. Enter the PiMiner. Following these steps will leave you with a very energy efficient bitcoin miner, as a Raspberry Pi only uses four watts of power, and a miner is typically 2.5W. Mining used to be done with computers consuming over 700W for the same process so to make a jump in savings helps repay the cost of the hardware we are using. However, the distinction is that the Raspberry Pi can mine, but doesn’t necessarily do so profitably. Mostly, this depends on the specific cryptocurrency, what it’s valued at and how much the Pi can generate each day. Though the Raspberry Pi doesn’t pack a ton of computing power, it’s incredibly energy efficient and there’s a low startup cost. Plus, it’s simple to get set up, and ... Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency, a form of electronic cash.It is a decentralized digital currency without a central bank or single administrator that can be sent from user to user via the bitcoin network.. There are two main methods for obtaining bitcoin: mining and purchasing. In this tutorial we will focus on cryptocurrency mining on the Raspberry Pi! ... Gibt es nicht eh nur Bitcoin? weiterlesen. Magi Coin Mining. Schritt für Schritt Anleitung um einen Raspberry Pi 4 als Miner zu verwenden und was man alles beachten sollte. weiterlesen. Remote Control. Eine Anleitung um den Raspberri Pi aus der Ferne zu bedienen. Egal ob nur Konsole, oder inkl. grafischer Oberfläche. weiterlesen. Informationen von der „Farm“ Ø CPU Temperatur. 53 °C. le

[index] [45568] [7733] [37338] [27401] [41800] [8648] [10523] [32436] [14815] [35110]

How to make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Rig - YouTube

Get an additional $10 in Bitcoins from Coinbase when purchasing through my referral link http://fredyen.com/get/Bitcoins Raspberry Pi: http://amzn.to/2l6yrW7... How to make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Rig - Duration: 9:43. Tinkernut Labs 308,837 views. 9:43. Pelosi wants extended unemployment benefits to hurt the economy: Steve Forbes - Duration: 6:57. ... Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining For 12 Hours! - Duration: 8:27. Rasim Muratovic 432,797 views. 8:27. Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help About ... Learn how to make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Rig. Hardware: 330Mh/z GPU - http://goo.gl/QlGVM7 Powered USB Hub - http://goo.gl/nvPzEy Raspberry Pi - http:... How to Setup a Raspberry Pi 2 Bitcoin Mining Rig w/ Bitmain AntMiner U3: https://youtu.be/dPWTSytzN7g Code to copy URL: https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/vi...

#